Amazon honda accord

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2021 Honda Accord

Model strengths:

Comfortable and spacious interior; fuel efficient; comfortable ride; excellent reliability; fun to drive

Model changes:

The Honda Accord Hybrid returns for 2021 with little changes such as a restyled front grille and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Model value:

The Honda Accord is a mid-sized sedan, competing in a crowded segment against the Toyota Camry, and Hyundai Sonata. The Accord Hybrid EX offers good value, but the Touring delivers luxury at low price. The Accord Hybrid offers everything a buyer would expect of a mid-sized car, including excellent ergonomics, a roomy interior and all the storage space a family might need.

Model overview:

The 2021 Honda Accord Hybrid comes with one drivetrain combination. A 2.0L engine that makes 143 horsepower, and two electric motors make 181 horsepower, that are used for most propulsion. Put the pedal to the metal and it will deliver a combined 212 horsepower. The gas engine can recharge the battery or solely used as the driving power. The drivetrain can move the car with 232 ft. lb. torque from 0 rpm, combined with a sport mode, this hybrid is a fun car to drive. Power is sent to the front wheels via a CVT transmission. The Honda Accord Hybrid comes in four basic trims: Base, EX, EX-L and Touring. The base trim is well equipped with tech and safety features. It includes 17-inch wheels, LED headlights with auto on/off, automatic high beam, dual-zone climate control, a rearview camera displayed on an 8-inch color LCD screen, Bluetooth connectivity and streaming audio, USB ports, Smart Entry and push button starter, remote starter, forward collision mitigation, lane keeping assist, Adaptive Cruise Control, pedestrian detection with auto brakes and acoustic signal, driver attention alert, and traffic sign recognition.The EX model builds on the base model adding sunroof, power driver seat, heated mirrors, heated front seats, Full LED headlights, LED fog lights, multi-angle rear view camera, Eco Assist system, wireless connection for Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, satellite radio, 8-speakers, wireless charging pad, two rear seat charging USB ports, Blind spot monitor, and rear cross-traffic alert. The EX-L enhances the previous trim with leather seats, driver seat memory, power passenger seat, 10-speaker audio system, and front and rear parking sensors. Top-of-the-line Touring models has it all plus, 19-inch wheels, adaptive suspension dampers, rain sensing windshield wipers, interior ambient lights, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, satellite navigation system, wi-fi hotspot, and a heads-up display. Packages available to all trims are All Season Protection I and II, Protection, Black Accent, Bronze Accent and Underbody Spoiler.
Sours: https://www.amazon.com/2021-Honda-Accord/dp/B08CF2Z5V8

2019 Honda Accord

What's new:

The 10th-generation Accord carries through to its second year fundamentally unchanged, following a big redesign for 2018.

What's hot:
  • Available 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder is torquey and fun, but also impressively fuel-efficient.
  • Feature-packed interior with tech extras and nice flourishes at a competitive price.
  • A manual is available with the 2.0L at Sport trim.
What's not:
  • Some interior touchpoints have a slightly cheap feel.
  • You can no longer get Honda’s glorious Lane Watch blindspot monitoring camera on the Accord.

Who says you have to drop big bucks on a German sedan to have a precision-handling five-seater with some guts? The Accord 2.0T just might be the ultimate sleeper of its segment. Wrapped in an unassuming exterior, the Accord doesn’t go out of its way to broadcast “performance” or shout from the rooftops that it’s “fun.” But spend a bit of time with this mild-seeming sedan, and you’ll be surprised on a number of fronts. Having dropped the fun but long-in-tooth J-series V6 in 2017, the top-trim Accord now runs a modern turbocharged VTEC 4-cylinder, and this is its secret weapon: this engine is a detuned version of Civic Type R’s 306-hp firebreather. Layer in some competent road manners and a comfortable and feature-packed interior, and you may end up wondering how the Accord wasn’t always at the top of your list. At the very least, you’re going to want to get to know it a little better.

Expert Review Vehicle Image

At first glance, the Accord manages to be both polarizing and innocuous at the same time. The wide chrome blade that dominates the low grille and lends a distinct beetle-browed look to the LED headlights tapers off into each fender, giving way to a traditionally contoured body and not ultra-memorable profile. Open up a door and step inside, and the interior continues the theme: it’s all very plain and clean-lined, with a soothing and understated palette. There’s a fair bit of that elephant-grain light grey textile that can make Honda interiors seem dated, but there’s some lovely satin-finish dark wood trim, too, and the contrast is nice. The cabin is roomy, with comfortable seating both fore and aft—front seats are both heated and cooled, and the driver’s seat is 12-way power adjustable at top Touring trim. Rear seats are also heated on the Touring, and get almost limo-like legroom. Other than that, there aren’t a ton of other amenities back there, just a simple climate vent and a pair of cupholders in the armrest, so backseat passengers should count their blessings. Those seats split 60/40 and fold nearly flat, opening up a vast gulf of cargo space for a sedan: even with the seats up, the Accord’s giant trunk holds 16.7 cubic feet, which dwarfs both the Mazda 6 (14.7) and Toyota Camry (15.1).

The center console is minimalist and mostly goes easy on the buttons, save for the all-important Sport mode and the pushbutton gear selectors—I get that everyone needs to have a novelty shifter these days, and this one is fine. A nicely-damped cubby door beneath the centerstack reveals a wireless charging pad for your phone—how civilized, to charge your phone in an enclosure rather than having it slide around the cabin. The touchscreen rises from the dash like a semi-detached tablet, and the infotainment interface is nicely done. It features an intuitive layout and highly configurable settings—it’ll let you choose type and volume for warnings, and set sensitivity parameters for things like touchscreen pressure and forward collision warning distance. The navigation is also great, and similarly configurable: it lets you set “custom avoidances” to circumvent certain roads, or entire areas. It also gives you the option of seeing “offroad breadcrumbs”—maybe not of much use for Accord, but how I wish every truck had this! The interface also has a solid smattering of good analog controls, including a volume knob—this is a breakthrough for Honda, whose infotainment suffered across multiple iterations without one. Climate settings are right there for you as intuitive tactile controls—and interestingly, not repeated in the touchscreen. Steering wheel buttons are clearly labeled and intuitive, and the tactile up/down roller adjusters are good. However, the switchgear overall has a bit of a cheap feel, with hard-click touchpoints that lend a ticky-tack quality. It’s the only strike against a button game that’s otherwise top-notch. But unique details, like the temperature knob trim rings that glow briefly red or blue when you adjust the temperature up or down, I think more than make up for any shortcomings.

Expert Review Vehicle Image

Hit the road and additional pleasures unfold, not the least of which is that powerplant. The 2.0L delivers astonishingly stout acceleration for its size, owing to its emphasis on torque—with an impressive 273 lb-ft that’s fully available at just 1,500 rpm, this pouncy sedan will chirp its tires after only the merest hint of turbo lag. Its pep is further enhanced by an excellent Sport mode, which not only sharpens throttle response and shift mapping for the 10-speed automatic, but shores up adaptive damping and steering feedback as well. You even get paddle shifters that actually do a decent job of firing off quick shifts. And if you prefer an even more active role, you can get an Accord at Sport trim with the 2.0L and a six-speed manual. And the 2.0L isn’t even the only excellent turbocharged four-cylinder you can get—there’s also a fuel-sipping 1.5L, which I haven’t tried in the Accord but found quite adequately motivating in the CR-V. The Accord is also available as a hybrid, which in terms of powertrain selection puts it nearly on par with its ancient nemesis, Toyota Camry—though it bests the Camry on price at most configurations. And even at top trim with its largest 4-cylinder, the Accord gets some decent fuel economy: the 2.0L with the automatic is rated by the EPA to get 23 mpg city, 34 highway, and 26 combined. I was consistently getting 25 in the real world, despite hot-rodding around in Sport mode for most of my week with it.

The Accord’s handling is a good match for its power, with quick steering and a nimble suspension, particularly in Sport mode. With its front-wheel drive configuration, the Accord can get a bit of torque-steer if you really jam the accelerator, but is otherwise composed. On the highway, it tracks straight and tranquil, in part because the adaptive damping calms and centers the suspension at highway speeds. The ride is reasonably firm, but never jarring. Really the only drawback to the Accord’s ride is some pronounced road noise over bad stretches of pavement, thanks to its giant sawblade wheels—and that’s despite active noise cancellation, including “wheel resonators” that you wouldn’t even know are there. At 19 inches, the wheels allow for only a 40 series tire, and while they may look sharp, they do a job on the Accord’s ride quality. If you’re considering a Touring or a Sport, I’d see about substituting the smaller wheels from the EX and lower trims, to give you room to fit a more forgiving tire.

Expert Review Vehicle Image

As for driver tech, it’s all there and on the whole it works great. Honda Sensing is a suite of crash-avoidance and driver-assistance tech that includes adaptive cruise, traffic sign recognition, lane-keep, auto emergency braking, and road-departure mitigation—and it’s standard on every trim of Accord. I found the adaptive cruise was pretty good, though it sometimes seems “startled” by vehicles in the next lane over, losing momentum slightly even when the slower vehicle was in its periphery. However, its lane-keep assistance is among the best in the game—almost but not quite autonomous, it makes almost imperceptible corrections to steering to keep you on course. I’d say it’s almost as good as Nissan’s much-hyped and more costly ProPilot, and it’s impressive that the Honda’s is a standard feature. Over and above the safety tech, Touring trim also gives you mobile hotspot capability, satellite-guided nav, and a configurable heads-up display that puts crucial metrics right in your line of sight. The gauge cluster blends a big analog speedometer with a second LCD gauge that’s configurable as whatever you want: nav, radio station, fuel economy and trip info, you name it. It harmonizes nicely as a big tach, especially in Sport mode, which also adds a boost gauge. The skinny center screen is not as configurable, but with all that, it’s basically redundant anyway. The only off note is that Apple Car Play and Android Auto are only available at Sport trim and above, but other than that, the Accord’s tech is a pretty complete package.

And really, what sells the Accord above all is its value. Even with all of the goodies described above, you will be hard-pressed to nudge the price much past $37K, including destination charge. That’s about $1,000 less than a comparable Camry, whose top-trim versions run a V6 and can’t give you the Accord’s stellar fuel economy. However, look at the Accord next to a BMW 3-series and you’ll realize that Honda is setting its sights higher. The 330i’s $40K+ starting price balloons to $48K when you option it up with all the stuff the Touring comes with. Sure, if you’re a driving enthusiast you might like a rear-drive 3-series more. But $11K more? It’s certainly worth taking the feature-packed Accord for a spin to see if it meets your needs at a much more reasonable price.

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Trim tested - 2019 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/2019-Honda-Accord/dp/B07MB677JG
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2018 Honda Accord

What's new:

The 2018 Accord is all new for its 10th generation, both inside and out. Notable changes include a pair of turbocharged four-cylinders instead of the outgoing V6, a more rigid and refined chassis incorporating a lot of high-strength steel, and sleeker exterior and interior styling. [Editor's note: the Accord reviewed here is a 2019, which carried through fundamentally unchanged from the 2018 model year].

What's hot:
  • Available 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder is torquey and fun, but also impressively fuel-efficient.
  • Feature-packed interior with tech extras and nice flourishes at a competitive price.
  • A manual is available with the 2.0L at Sport trim.
What's not:
  • Some interior touchpoints have a slightly cheap feel.
  • You can no longer get Honda’s glorious Lane Watch blindspot monitoring camera on the Accord.

Who says you have to drop big bucks on a German sedan to have a precision-handling five-seater with some guts? The Accord 2.0T just might be the ultimate sleeper of its segment. Wrapped in an unassuming exterior, the Accord doesn’t go out of its way to broadcast “performance” or shout from the rooftops that it’s “fun.” But spend a bit of time with this mild-seeming sedan, and you’ll be surprised on a number of fronts. Having dropped the fun but long-in-tooth J-series V6 in 2017, the top-trim Accord now runs a modern turbocharged VTEC 4-cylinder, and this is its secret weapon: this engine is a detuned version of Civic Type R’s 306-hp firebreather. Layer in some competent road manners and a comfortable and feature-packed interior, and you may end up wondering how the Accord wasn’t always at the top of your list. At the very least, you’re going to want to get to know it a little better.

Expert Review Vehicle Image

At first glance, this new Accord manages to be both polarizing and innocuous at the same time. The wide chrome blade that dominates the low grille and lends a distinct beetle-browed look to the LED headlights tapers off into each fender, giving way to a traditionally contoured body and not ultra-memorable profile. Open up a door and step inside, and the interior continues the theme: it’s all very plain and clean-lined, with a soothing and understated palette. There’s a fair bit of that elephant-grain light grey textile that can make Honda interiors seem dated, but there’s some lovely satin-finish dark wood trim, too, and the contrast is nice. The cabin is roomy, with comfortable seating both fore and aft—front seats are both heated and cooled, and the driver’s seat is 12-way power adjustable at top Touring trim. Rear seats are also heated on the Touring, and get almost limo-like legroom. Other than that, there aren’t a ton of other amenities back there, just a simple climate vent and a pair of cupholders in the armrest, so backseat passengers should count their blessings. Those seats split 60/40 and fold nearly flat, opening up a vast gulf of cargo space for a sedan: even with the seats up, the Accord’s giant trunk holds 16.7 cubic feet, which dwarfs both the Mazda 6 (14.7) and Toyota Camry (15.1).

The center console is minimalist and mostly goes easy on the buttons, save for the all-important Sport mode and the pushbutton gear selectors—I get that everyone needs to have a novelty shifter these days, and this one is fine. A nicely-damped cubby door beneath the centerstack reveals a wireless charging pad for your phone—how civilized, to charge your phone in an enclosure rather than having it slide around the cabin. The touchscreen rises from the dash like a semi-detached tablet, and the infotainment interface is nicely done. It features an intuitive layout and highly configurable settings—it’ll let you choose type and volume for warnings, and set sensitivity parameters for things like touchscreen pressure and forward collision warning distance. The navigation is also great, and similarly configurable: it lets you set “custom avoidances” to circumvent certain roads, or entire areas. It also gives you the option of seeing “offroad breadcrumbs”—maybe not of much use for Accord, but how I wish every truck had this! The interface also has a solid smattering of good analog controls, including a volume knob—this is a breakthrough for Honda, whose infotainment suffered across multiple iterations without one. Climate settings are right there for you as intuitive tactile controls—and interestingly, not repeated in the touchscreen. Steering wheel buttons are clearly labeled and intuitive, and the tactile up/down roller adjusters are good. However, the switchgear overall has a bit of a cheap feel, with hard-click touchpoints that lend a ticky-tack quality. It’s the only strike against a button game that’s otherwise top-notch. But unique details, like the temperature knob trim rings that glow briefly red or blue when you adjust the temperature up or down, I think more than make up for any shortcomings.

Expert Review Vehicle Image

Hit the road and additional pleasures unfold, not the least of which is that powerplant. The 2.0L delivers astonishingly stout acceleration for its size, owing to its emphasis on torque—with an impressive 273 lb-ft that’s fully available at just 1,500 rpm, this pouncy sedan will chirp its tires after only the merest hint of turbo lag. Its pep is further enhanced by an excellent Sport mode, which not only sharpens throttle response and shift mapping for the 10-speed automatic, but shores up adaptive damping and steering feedback as well. You even get paddle shifters that actually do a decent job of firing off quick shifts. And if you prefer an even more active role, you can get an Accord at Sport trim with the 2.0L and a six-speed manual. And the 2.0L isn’t even the only excellent turbocharged four-cylinder you can get—there’s also a fuel-sipping 1.5L, which I haven’t tried in the Accord but found quite adequately motivating in the CR-V. The Accord is also available as a hybrid, which in terms of powertrain selection puts it nearly on par with its ancient nemesis, Toyota Camry—though it bests the Camry on price at most configurations. And even at top trim with its largest 4-cylinder, the Accord gets some decent fuel economy: the 2.0L with the automatic is rated by the EPA to get 23 mpg city, 34 highway, and 26 combined. I was consistently getting 25 in the real world, despite hot-rodding around in Sport mode for most of my week with it.

The Accord’s handling is a good match for its power, with quick steering and a nimble suspension, particularly in Sport mode. With its front-wheel drive configuration, the Accord can get a bit of torque-steer if you really jam the accelerator, but is otherwise composed. On the highway, it tracks straight and tranquil, in part because the adaptive damping calms and centers the suspension at highway speeds. The ride is reasonably firm, but never jarring. Really the only drawback to the Accord’s ride is some pronounced road noise over bad stretches of pavement, thanks to its giant sawblade wheels—and that’s despite active noise cancellation, including “wheel resonators” that you wouldn’t even know are there. At 19 inches, the wheels allow for only a 40 series tire, and while they may look sharp, they do a job on the Accord’s ride quality. If you’re considering a Touring or a Sport, I’d see about substituting the smaller wheels from the EX and lower trims, to give you room to fit a more forgiving tire.

Expert Review Vehicle Image

As for driver tech, it’s all there and on the whole it works great. Honda Sensing is a suite of crash-avoidance and driver-assistance tech that includes adaptive cruise, traffic sign recognition, lane-keep, auto emergency braking, and road-departure mitigation—and it’s standard on every trim of Accord. I found the adaptive cruise was pretty good, though it sometimes seems “startled” by vehicles in the next lane over, losing momentum slightly even when the slower vehicle was in its periphery. However, its lane-keep assistance is among the best in the game—almost but not quite autonomous, it makes almost imperceptible corrections to steering to keep you on course. I’d say it’s almost as good as Nissan’s much-hyped and more costly ProPilot, and it’s impressive that the Honda’s is a standard feature. Over and above the safety tech, Touring trim also gives you mobile hotspot capability, satellite-guided nav, and a configurable heads-up display that puts crucial metrics right in your line of sight. The gauge cluster blends a big analog speedometer with a second LCD gauge that’s configurable as whatever you want: nav, radio station, fuel economy and trip info, you name it. It harmonizes nicely as a big tach, especially in Sport mode, which also adds a boost gauge. The skinny center screen is not as configurable, but with all that, it’s basically redundant anyway. The only off note is that Apple Car Play and Android Auto are only available at Sport trim and above, but other than that, the Accord’s tech is a pretty complete package.

And really, what sells the Accord above all is its value. Even with all of the goodies described above, you will be hard-pressed to nudge the price much past $37K, including destination charge. That’s about $1,000 less than a comparable Camry, whose top-trim versions run a V6 and can’t give you the Accord’s stellar fuel economy. However, look at the Accord next to a BMW 3-series and you’ll realize that Honda is setting its sights higher. The 330i’s $40K+ starting price balloons to $48K when you option it up with all the stuff the Touring comes with. Sure, if you’re a driving enthusiast you might like a rear-drive 3-series more. But $11K more? It’s certainly worth taking the feature-packed Accord for a spin to see if it meets your needs at a much more reasonable price.

Expert Review Vehicle Image

Trim tested - 2019 Honda Accord Touring 2.0T

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/2018-Honda-Accord/dp/B071G1H4S2
25 Different Accessories MODS You Can Have In Your HONDA ACCORD Exterior Interior

Best Honda Accord Seat Covers

Aug 20, 2020 - 5 Recommendations

Your car seats experience a lot of wear and tear, not just from you sitting in them, but also from harmful UV rays that cause fading, cracking, and peeling. Not only do seat covers protect your seats from all that damage, they can add a bit of luxury or sporty styling to your cabin. If you're shopping for seat covers, you might be overwhelmed by all the options out there, but don't choose based on appearance alone. You'll want seat covers made from quality materials, but you'll also have to make sure they're compatible with side airbags if your vehicle is equipped with them. Since most seat covers are designed to be universal, you'll also want to check that they'll fit your vehicle. You should also consider how easy or difficult they are to install, as some seat covers can be frustrating to get in place with a snug fit.

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Sours: https://www.amazon.com/honda-accord-accessories/s?k=honda+accord+accessories

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2008 8th gen honda accord 2.4L - 70$ Amazon/ebay cold air intake

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