De urban dictionary

De urban dictionary DEFAULT

An addicting game for the SNES and Nintendo Gamecube that was and still is, arguably, the best puzzler on the console at that time. It has been ported to several other NinCo systems and localized in North America under the name Tetris Attack.

There were also several other rereleases both in Japan, and America. The list of known commercially released Panel de Pon releases are below, in italicized text.

The main premise of Panel de Pon is that you are given a stack of rising panels. You are to flip panels two at a time until you got three or more identical panels in a row. Failure to do so would mean the stack of panels touching the top and unfortunately losing the game.

The more appealing part of PdP was to get chains (PdP gamer speak for chain reactions) in which one set of panels would pop, causing another set of panels to fall down, which caused another set of panels to drop. In Versus or Versus CPU mode, doing chains or combos (popping more than three panels) would result on garbage blocks being placed on the other player's side of the battlefield, which could be eliminated by popping adjacent panels.

There's more to it than that, but this definition should only be so big. The best website to learn more about this addictive game would be www.tetrisattack.net.

The main Panel de Pon releases (and subsequent rereleases) are:

Panel de Pon (Japan; Super Nintendo and Game Boy
Tetris Attack (America; Super Nintendo and Game Boy)
Pokémon Puzzle League (Japan, America; Nintendo 64)
Pokémon Puzzle Challenge (Japan, America; Game Boy Color)
Part of Nintendo Puzzle Collection (Japan and Europe; GCN. A US release was cancelled.)

by Spiritsnare July 12, 2004

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Sours: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Pon%20de

phrase used in Ireland to describe a slippery customer, a rogue, a charlatan, someone who seems upstanding or innocent and mild but who never misses an opportunity to screw you over, scam you, rip you off or hide their farcical f**k ups, blame everyone else for the s**t they cause and generally lure you into their Machiavellian trap unsurprisingly generally applied to cowboy politicians, corrupt rich tax evaders and their ilk

1. Peader: Ah sure Seamus I'd be doing ye a favour if I bought them there sorry lookin' cows of ye for tuppence.
Seamus: Ah would you go and shite ya cute hoor, I'm not a feckin eejit! They're worth their weight in spuds!
2. Bertie

by Yvonne March 24,

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Sours: https://www.urbandictionary.com/
  1. Hoyt torrex bow
  2. Top selling devotional books
  3. Southern gap adventures
  4. Ps1 game boxes
  5. G2a sea of thieves pc

A great idea initially , but its quality has drastically deteriorated year after year and continues to get worse. It was founded in by Aaron Peckham while he was a freshman computer science major. Shortly afterwards it became abused by mostly teenagers/ dumbass children and to a lesser degree mentally stunted adults (largely due to the non-existent moderater position to look over words submitted). These individuals continue to flood its space with high levels of immaturity, retardation, first names of acquaintances with definitions that don't make sense to anyone, political bias, shitty grammar, nonsensical sexual innuendo stupidity and random words with definitions pulled out of thin air that are not used as slang by any living being in society . On occasion you can actually find a professional input of a real slang word that is legitimate and professional. RIP URBAN DICTIONARY. "You were good while you lasted."

Urban Dictionary is garbage. Everytime I go on this website a piece of my heart dies and I shed a tear.

by Old school bossman September 14,

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Verb. To take a completely random word and give it a sexual/gross meaning. You can literally do this to every imaginable word.

This got its meaning from the popular site "Urban Dictionary", you may have heard of it.

On this site people have a habit of giving random words sexual or gross meanings and acting like said meaning is a popular usage of it, when in reality it's just something they made up 5 minutes ago.

Dude, i'm so bored. I'm going to Urban Dictionary some words.

Cat - To get a blowjob right after taking a piss.

HAHA, DUDE!! THAT IS SO GROSS, YET BELIEVABLE!

by Bloodbath 87 March 04,

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Mostly people who just want to share their ridiculous slang words, to enhance the English language.

However; often used as a way for jealous or angsty people to post hate towards whom ever they wish with impunity (by way of anonymity). Examples can be found in posts for almost all stereotypes (hip, goth, emo, rocker, skater. etc), almost all nationalities, bands or music groups, and basically any thing that anyone could feel threatened by. When searching for a hate message or angst filled reply, look for the following:

- The entire entry written in first person form from the poster. Often in a way that makes the poster seem superior to the crowd they are defining

ie>

"(insert defined group here): hello nice day were having
(insert poster here): Fuck you (defined group here), your not (positive adjective)!"

- A lack of any real knowledge on the subject other than that already known to the general public. Also contains a combination of personal opinions in as a fact on the topic matter.

ie>

"Britney spears sucks and she can't sing. Blond haired bimbo whos music is awful and whos followers don't know sh*t."

- Anyone who writes anything claiming to know the real truth. Most common in music postings. It's a way of saying mainstream or well known artists or opinions are always bad/wrong. The argument can't be maintained since music is a personal choice and as such how good or bad any piece of music is can only be determined by the individual.

ie>

"50 Cent blows and only if you listen to MF Doom you are sick."

"If you like Pulp fiction and have never even heard of Trainspotting your obviously don't know shit."

- Politics coming into play. For a definition politics play no bearing, only the represented fact. Even while describing politically charged term no politics should be permitted to taint the description.

ie>

"Neocons want to destory the whole world with their wars and military industrial complex."

opposed with,

"Neocons are often pro war and defend establishment and maintenance of the military industrial complex."

- Lastly; Racism. Avoid it. People can't help how they are born, make fun of them for choice they do make.

ie>

"Fuck (insert race/gender/colour/sexual orientation/looks/height/or anything genetically predisposed)"

There is hope though. As an Urban dictionary poster, you can avoid all of the aforementioned pitfalls by just following these easy rules:

1) Don't assume your better than anyone else.

2) Write down what you know and don't speculate on anything.

3) Exclude your personal opinion.

4) Use a spell check.

Knowledge is power. Misinformation is cancer.

A lot of posts on Urban Dictionary could be re-written or deleted off this web site. Specifically anything which doesn't add anything to a definition.

by iRant May 06,

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Sours: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Urban%20Dictionary
Latinos Guess Urban Dictionary Terms

On January 24, , a user by the name of d0ughb0y uploaded a definition to Urban Dictionary, the popular online lexicon that relies on crowdsourced definitions. Under Donald Trump—who, four days prior, was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, prompting multiple Women's Marches a day later—he wrote: "The man who got more obese women out to walk on his first day in office than Michelle Obama did in eight years." Since being uploaded, it has received 25, upvotes and is considered the top definition for Donald Trump. It is followed by descriptions that include: "He doesn't like China because they actually have a great wall"; "A Cheeto… a legit Cheeto"; and "What all hispanics refer to as 'el diablo.'" In total, there are definitions for Donald Trump—some hilarious, others so packed with bias you wonder if the president himself actually wrote them, yet none of them are entirely accurate.

Urban Dictionary, now in its 20th year, is a digital repository that contains more than 8 million definitions and famously houses all manner of slang and cultural expressions. Founded by Aaron Peckham in —then a computer science major at Cal Poly—the site became notorious for allowing what sanctioned linguistic gatekeepers, such as the Oxford English Dictionary and Merriam-Webster, would not: a plurality of voice. In interviews, Peckham has said the site began as a joke, as a way to mock Dictionary.com, but it didn't take long before it ballooned into a thriving corpus.

Today, Urban Dictionary averages around 65 million visitors a month, according to data from SimilarWeb, with almost percent of its traffic originating via organic search. You can find definitions for just about anything or anyone: from popular phrases like Hot Girl Summer ("a term used to define girls being unapologetically themselves, having fun, loving yourself, and doing YOU") and In my bag ("the act of being in your own world; focused; being in the zone; on your grind") to musicians like Pete Wentz ("an emo legend. his eyeliner could literally kill a man"); even my name, Jason, has an insane definitions (my favorite one, which I can attest is 1, percent true: "the absolute greatest person alive").

In the beginning, Peckham's project was intended as a corrective. He wanted, in part, to help map the vastness of the human lexicon, in all its slippery, subjective glory (a message on the homepage of the site reads: "Urban Dictionary Is Written By You"). Back then, the most exciting, and sometimes most culture-defining, slang was being coined constantly, in real time. What was needed was an official archive for those evolving styles of communication. "A printed dictionary, which is updated rarely," Peckham said in , "tells you what thoughts are OK to have, what words are OK to say." That sort of one-sided authority did not sit well with him. So he developed a version that ascribed to a less exclusionary tone: local and popular slang, or what linguist Gretchen McCulloch might refer to as "public, informal, unselfconscious language" now had a proper home.

Under Lady Gaga, one top entry describes her as "a very bad joke played on all of us by Tim Burton." For LeBron James, it reads: "To bail out on your team when times get tough."

In time, however, the site began to espouse the worst of the internet—Urban Dictionary became something much uglier than perhaps what Peckham set out to create. It transformed into a harbor for hate speech. By allowing anyone to post definitions (users can up or down vote their favorite ones) Peckham opened the door for the most insidious among us. Racism, homophobia, xenophobia, and sexism currently serve as the basis for some of the most popular definitions on the site. In fact, one of the site's definitions for sexism details it as "a way of life like welfare for black people. now stop bitching and get back to the kitchen." Under Lady Gaga, one top entry describes her as the embodiment of "a very bad joke played on all of us by Tim Burton." For LeBron James, it reads: "To bail out on your team when times get tough."

When I first discovered Urban Dictionary around , I considered it a public good. The internet still carried an air of innocence then; the lion's share of people who roamed chat forums and posted on LiveJournal had yet to adopt the mob instincts of cancel culture; Twitter was years away from warping our consumption habits and Facebook was only a fraction of the giant it is today. I was relatively new to what the internet could offer—its infinite landscapes dazzled my curious teenage mind—and found a strange solace in Urban Dictionary.

My understanding of it hewed to a simple logic. Here was a place where words and phrases that friends, cousins, neighbors, and people I knew used with regularity found resonance and meaning. Before Urban Dictionary, I'd never seen words like hella or jawn defined anywhere other than in conversation. That they were afforded a kind of linguistic reverence was what awed me, what drew me in. The site, it then seemed, was an oasis for all varieties of slang, text speak, and cultural idioms. (Later, as black culture became the principal vortex for which popular culture mined cool, intra-communal expressions like bae, on fleek, and turnt, were increasingly the property of the wider public.) It was a place where entry into the arena did not require language to adhere to the rules of proper grammar. As Mary B. Zeigler and Viktor Osinubi proposed in “Theorizing the Postcoloniality of African American English,”, it is the “cultural elite and their allies who help enforce acceptable codes of linguistic conduct,” which unfairly leverages social customs.

Urban Dictionary's abandonment of that edict afforded it a rebel spirit. Early on, the beauty of the site was its deep insistence on showing how slang is socialized based on a range of factors: community, school, work. How we casually convey meaning is a direct reflection of our geography, our networks, our worldviews. At its best, Urban Dictionary crystallized that proficiency. Slang is often understood as a less serious form of literacy, as deficient or lacking. Urban Dictionary said otherwise. It let the cultivators of the most forward-looking expressions of language speak for themselves. It believed in the splendor of slang that was deemed unceremonious and paltry.

In her new book, Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language, McCulloch puts forward a question: "But what kind of net can you use to capture living language?" She tells the story of German dialectologist Georg Wenker, who mailed postal surveys to teachers and asked them to translate sentences. French linguist Jules Gilliéron later innovated on Wenker's method: He sent a trained worker into the field to oversee the surveys. This practice was known as dialect mapping. The hope was to identify the rich, varied characteristics of a given language: be it speech patterns, specific terminology, or the lifespan of shared vocabulary. For a time, field studies went on like this. Similar to Wikipedia and Genius, Urban Dictionary inverted that approach through crowdsourcing: the people came to it.

Luckily, like language, the internet is stubbornly resistant to stasis. It is constantly reconfiguring and building anew. Today, other digital portals—Twitter, Instagram, gossip blogs like Bossip and The Shade Room, even group texts on our smartphones—function as better incubators of language than Urban Dictionary.

"In the early years of Urban Dictionary we tried to keep certain words out," Peckham once said. "But it was impossible—authors would re-upload definitions, or upload definitions with alternate spellings. Today, I don't think it's the right thing to try to remove offensive words." (Peckham didn't respond to emails seeking comment for this story.) One regular defense he lobbed at critics was that the site, and its cornucopia of definitions, was not meant to be taken at face value. Its goodness and its nastiness, instead, were a snapshot of a collective outlook. If anything, Peckham said, Urban Dictionary tapped into the pulse of our thinking.

But if the radiant array of terminology uploaded to the site was initially meant to function as a possibility of human speech, it is now mostly a repository of vile language. In its current form, Urban Dictionary is a cauldron of explanatory excess and raw prejudice. "The problem for Peckham's bottom line is that derogatory content—not the organic evolution of language in the internet era—may be the site's primary appeal," Clio Chang wrote in The New Republic in , as the site was taking on its present identity.

Luckily, like language, the internet is stubbornly resistant to stasis. It is constantly reconfiguring and building anew. Today, other digital portals—Twitter, Instagram, gossip blogs like Bossip and The Shade Room, even group texts on our smartphones—function as better incubators of language than Urban Dictionary. Consider how Bossip's headline mastery functions as a direct extension of black style—which is to say the site embraces, head on, the syntax and niche vernacular of a small community of people. The endeavor is both an acknowledgement of and a lifeline to a facet of black identity.

That's not to say Urban Dictionary is vacant any good, but its utility, as a window into different communities and local subcultures, as a tool that extends sharp and luminous insight, has been obscured by darker intentions. What began as a joke is no longer funny. Even those who operate on the site understand it for what it's eroded into. The top definition for Urban Dictionary reads: "Supposed to [b]e a user-inputed dictionary for words. However, has become a mindless forum of jokes, view-points, sex, and basically anything but the real definition of a word." Where Oxford and Merriam-Webster erected walls around language, essentially controlling what words and expressions society deemed acceptable, Urban Dictionary, in its genesis, helped to democratize that process. Only the republic eventually ate itself.


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Dictionary de urban

The Urban Dictionary, Street Wisdom and God: An Intersection of Linguistics and Theology

Willhauck, Susan. "The Urban Dictionary, Street Wisdom and God: An Intersection of Linguistics and Theology" International Journal of Practical Theology, vol. 17, no. 1, , pp. https://doi.org//ijpt

Willhauck, S. (). The Urban Dictionary, Street Wisdom and God: An Intersection of Linguistics and Theology. International Journal of Practical Theology, 17(1), https://doi.org//ijpt

Willhauck, S. () The Urban Dictionary, Street Wisdom and God: An Intersection of Linguistics and Theology. International Journal of Practical Theology, Vol. 17 (Issue 1), pp. https://doi.org//ijpt

Willhauck, Susan. "The Urban Dictionary, Street Wisdom and God: An Intersection of Linguistics and Theology" International Journal of Practical Theology 17, no. 1 (): https://doi.org//ijpt

Willhauck S. The Urban Dictionary, Street Wisdom and God: An Intersection of Linguistics and Theology. International Journal of Practical Theology. ;17(1): https://doi.org//ijpt

Sours: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi//ijpt/html
Te ayudo a entender memes traduciendo palabras de urbandictionary

Dede is a nickname for people with the names: Darius, Darian, Daymien, Darrien, Dariush, and Dario (however not confined to these names). Dede is derived from the latin term daeda, meaning; man of knowledge and great intellect.

Example #1: Did you see Dede today? I think he skipped class

Example #2: Hey Dede what's good?

Example #3: Dede drank all my Coke. Fuck.

Example #4: Yo Dede's dating Simon Fruck now.
Example #5: How's Dede? he said he wasn't feeling good today.

by THE FLATTERING TURTLE BEAST January 08, 2021

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a petite bi-racial female, who usually lives on the east coast of the US. NEVER sexy; classy, beautiful; a charmer. Fun and outgoing, very prudey, practical.

Her friends are great, but often bitch, and secretly, she has crushes on the nerdy kids even though she is INCREDIBLY POPULAR!!!

ex.1-eddie:"damnnn do u see dede...that girl is SEXY!!"
stepfon:"dede is too classy...don't call her sexy; she's beautiful."

ex.2-dede:"gilbert looks really cute today"
kenzie:"gilberts sucha geek....why are u talking about him?!?"
dede:"ughhh, i don't know, lets just change the subject." thinking to herself...I LOVE GILBERT!!

by fjska April 18, 2008

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