Gascogne dog

Gascogne dog DEFAULT

Basset Bleu De Gascogne

Origin

France is the original home of many hounds, and, as his name suggests, this also includes the Basset Bleu de Gascogne dog breed, a dog that hails from Gascogny in the south-west of France. Blue hounds from this region are mentioned as early as the 12th century and were said to have helped hunt out wild boar and wolves as well as deer. The breed nearly died out at the start of the 20th century, but the longer-legged Bleu de Gascogne was used in breeding programmes to bring the Basset Bleu back from the brink of extinction.

Personality

The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is affectionate towards his family and friends, but a little reserved with others. He should be 'sagacious' and 'audacious' – words rarely found in canine breed standards, suggesting this dog really is one of a kind! Like all scenthounds, the Basset Bleu is never happier than when he has his nose to the ground, following the trail of an interesting smell.

Health

The Basset Bleu is not known to suffer widely from many inherited conditions. Like other dogs with this body shape they can be expected to be more prone to spinal disorders and abnormal joint development.

Exercise

Like most hounds, the Basset Bleu de Gascogne can become deaf when following his nose, so a reliable recall is essential, as is exercising him off-lead only in safe, non-traffic areas. He was bred for extended, slow hunts, so is more of a long-distance plodder than a short-distance sprinter, and needs a couple of hours' daily exercise to burn off his energy, along with a chance to use his nose.

Nutrition

Your dog's diet needs to have the right balance of all the main nutrient groups including a constant supply of fresh water. It's also important to conduct regular body condition scores to ensure you keep your dog in ideal shape and remember to feed him at least twice daily and in accordance with the feeding guidelines of his particular food. The Basset Bleu is prone to bloating and stomach problems; smaller, more frequent meals can help minimise this risk.

Grooming

The short, dense coat is low-maintenance, requiring little more than a weekly groom to remove any dead coat and keep it looking healthy. Owners may give this dog an occasional bath if necessary. Their ears require careful attention, as ear infections can occur due to limited airflow.

Sours: https://www.purina.eu/dogs/dog-breeds/library/basset-bleu-de-gascogne

Grand Bleu de Gascogne

Dog breed

Grand Bleu de Gascogne
Grand Bleu de Gascogne in a blue dogcollar.jpg

Grand Bleu de Gascogne

OriginFrance
Height Dogs 65–72 cm (26–28 in)
Bitches 62–68 cm (24–27 in)
Coat Short and thick
Colour Mottled black and white
Life span Over 10 years
Dog (domestic dog)

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is a breed of dog of the scenthoundtype, originating in France and used for hunting in packs. Today's breed is the descendant of a very old type of large hunting dog, and is an important breed in the ancestry of many other hounds.

Description[edit]

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is an imposing large dog, a typical hunting pack hound of the oldest type, with a lean and muscular body, long legs, slightly domed head, long drop ears, and drooping lips. Size is 65 to 72 cm (25.6 to 28.3 ins) at the withers, females slightly smaller. Dogs of this breed should show an attitude of calm strength and nobleness.[1]

The colour of the coat is white mottled with black, giving a slate blue overall appearance. There are black patches on either side of the head, with a white area on top of the head which has in it a small black oval. Tan "eyebrow" marks are over each eye. Faults are deviations in appearance that have an effect on the health and working ability of the dog, as well as an absence of expected features of colour, structure, and size, indicating that a dog with such faults should not be bred. Faults include aggression or fearfulness, anatomical malformation, and lack of type.[1]

Although these are large dogs, "Grand" does not necessarily refer to the size of the dogs. "In most cases it is simply a label for a pack that is used for larger game".[2] Today. the breed is used in hunting boar, deer, and other game.[3] The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is a very large dog weighing 80-120 lbs

Health and temperament[edit]

No unusual health problems or claims of extraordinary health have been documented for this breed. Temperament of individual dogs may vary.

History and use[edit]

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne ancestors were contemporaries with the St Hubert Hound and English Southern Hound,[4]Comte de Foix kept a pack in the 14th century and Henry IV of France kept a pack in the late 16th and early 17th centuries.[citation needed]

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne has a long history in the US, the first dogs were bred there in the 18th century; more Grand Bleus are now in the US than France.[5]General Lafayette presented a pack of seven Grand Bleus to George Washington in 1785, who compared their melodious voices to the bells of Moscow.[6]

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is noted for its focus on the hunt, as well as a good nose and distinctive, sonorous, deep howl, the breed is "instinctively a pack hound".[1] In the past, it was used to hunt deer, wolves, and boar; in the field it is considered a rather slow and ponderous worker and today is predominantly used to hunt hares.[6]

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne has had a significant influence on the development of several breeds of scent hounds. After the French Revolution, it was used to revitalise the old Saintongeois, creating the Gascon Saintongeois, and the Bluetick Coonhound is considered a direct descendant of the Grand Bleu. The Grand Bleu de Gascogne was used by Sir John Buchanan-Jardine in the development of the Dumfriesshire Hound; in Britain, any native hounds with blue marbled coats are still referred to as 'Frenchies' after this breed.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Alderton, David, Hounds of the World, Swan Hill Press, Shrewsbury, 2000, ISBN 1-85310-912-6.
  • Clarke, Anne R., Brace, Andrew H. & Sporre-Willes, Renee, The International Encyclopedia of Dogs, Wiley, 1995, ISBN 0-87605-624-9.
  • Federation Cynologique Internationale, Great Gascony Blue, retrieved 15 Dec 14.
  • Fogle, Bruce, The Encyclopedia of the Dog, DK Publishing, New York, 2009, ISBN 978-0-7566-6004-8.
  • Hancock, David, Hounds: Hunting by Scent, The Crowood Press Ltd, Marlborough, 2014, ISBN 978-1-84797-601-7.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Bleu_de_Gascogne
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Grand Bleu de Gascogne

Photo of adult Grand Bleu de Gascogne

RanchoRosco / Wikipedia.org

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is one of the original bloodhound breeds in Europe. In the Middle Ages, noblemen often kept a pack of these fine dogs to use in their favourite pursuit, hunting. Their melodious howls would often be heard as they chased deer and other large game through the countryside. However, the breed lost much of its popularity in France between the 18th and 20th centuries. Instead, the mantle of preserving the breed fell to the United States where they had been exported to French colonies. Here the breed successfully managed to make it into the modern age.

Grand Bleu are extremely active dogs who are still most suited to a working environment or at least a rural setting. They are pack animals who would prefer to spend as much time as possible with their families. Any alone time will probably be spent practising their howling. However, with the right amount of exercise and companionship, a Grand Bleu will prove to be a friendly hunting companion who is always ready to follow a scent and set off on another adventure.

About & History

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is one of the many European breeds that is thought to have its roots in dogs spread around the continent by Phoenician traders. The earliest record of the breed comes from 14th century France where the Comte de Foix had a pack of hunting dogs. Throughout the centuries, the Grand Bleu has functioned as a pack-hunting dog. Nobles in medieval Europe kept packs of hounds for hunting large game such as deer, wolves and boar. Their primary purpose was to use their excellent noses to find their quarry. Once an animal had been found, they used their stamina to drive them to exhaustion, communicating through howls and deep barks.

The breed has a relatively long history in the US as well, indeed, there are now thought to be more Grand Bleu in the United States than in their native France. The first Grand Bleu crossed the pond in 18th century. General Lafayette, a French nobleman who fought with the Americans in the War of Independence, gave seven Grand Bleu to George Washington in 1785, who commented that their voices were so musical they reminded him of Moscow’s bells.

The Grand Bleu’s heydays of hunting with the landed gentry in France couldn’t last forever. Their numbers began to decline as the number of wolves reduced. They were expensive dogs to keep and many noblemen began switching to other breeds to keep their costs down. The breed took a further hit during and after the French Revolution when many French noblemen were unseated from their estates. In modern France, the Grand Bleu is a rare breed.

The Grand Bleu was such a good hunting hound that they were used in the development of other scent-hound breeds. Grand Bleu heritage can be found in diverse breeds, such as the Bluetick Coonhound of Louisiana, the Dumfriesshire Hound in the UK and the Basset Bleu de Gascogne to whom they passed on their distinctive coat colouring.

Appearance

A Grand Bleu de Gascogne is a large dog standing at 65 to 72cm tall and weighing 35 to 39 kg. They are instantly recognisable as bloodhound hunting dogs due to their long ears, which hang down to the base of the neck. Their muzzles have a boxy appearance due to their jowls, although this trait is less accentuated than in some other bloodhound breeds. Grand Bleu have muscular, lean bodies with long legs. They have deep chests which follows into the abdomen with a noticeable abdominal tuck.

The Grand Bleu’s coat is a complex of three different colours. Their base colouring is white mottled with black, giving them a marbled appearance. Larger black patches are imposed over this background on the chest and abdomen. The head is coloured black at the sides with a white, mottled streak down the centre. Their cheeks are usually tan, as is each ‘eyebrow’. Tan fur also covers their limbs towards the paws and parts of the sternum.

Character & Temperament

Grand Bleu de Gascogne are gentle giants. Although they can be aloof with strangers, once they’re comfortable their natural friendliness comes to the fore. It’s important to note that Grand Blue are still primarily kept as hunting dogs and their relaxed temperament may be dependent on enough exercise. Since they have not been bred for domestic settings, their ability to settle into family life will depend on experienced owners willing to dedicate enough time to exercising and stimulating their pet. That said, they are not aggressive dogs.

As pack dogs, they are highly sociable and enjoy being accompanied at all times. A lonely Grand Bleu will be a noisy Grand Bleu and although George Washington might have loved their voices, the constant baying of a hound might wear thin with close neighbours. They are most suited to a rural setting where they can accompany their owners on their daily tasks and get their fill of physical activity.

Trainability

Grand Bleu de Gascogne are intelligent hounds but this doesn’t make them easy to train. They are independent dogs with their own ideas about what to do. Once they’ve picked up a scent, they become so focused it can be hard to recall them. Training is essential for this breed to keep them under control. Time and patience are the key to successful training.

They are sensitive animals, so gentle correction will lead to better results than a heavy handed approach. Socialisation is an important aspect of training a Grand Bleu. Exposing them to as many people, dogs and environments will help them become confident adults.

Health

Grand Bleu de Gascogne are generally healthy dogs that haven’t developed the same levels of congenital health problems as other pedigree breeds. They have an average life expectancy of 10 to 12 years. Their downfall comes in their size and deep chests, which predisposes them to one condition:

Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV)

Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV), or simply 'Bloat', is a condition where the stomach begins to fill with gas and fluid. This can progress to GDV where the stomach turns on its axis, blocking passage of fluid through the intestines and escape of gas through the oesophagus. The enlarging stomach reduces the return of blood to the heart by pressing on the vena cava and can cause difficulty breathing.

Without immediate surgical intervention, GDV is a fatal condition. The cause of GDV is not fully known but the condition is more common in larger breeds and may be linked to exercise after large meals. Symptoms to look out for include restless behaviour, signs of abdominal pain and attempts to vomit without producing anything.

Exercise and Activity Levels

As hunting dogs, Grand Bleu were expected to chase athletic animals, such as deer and wolves. They have retained their immense stamina into the modern age. For them to be a happy, relaxed dog in the home, a Grand Bleu requires at least 2 hours of exercise a day. Their intelligence means that they also need mental stimulation. Their exercise should be off the lead whenever possible to allow them to indulge their scenting instincts. If your Grand Bleu isn’t getting enough exercise, they’ll let you know through destructive behaviour at home.

When not out on a walk, Grand Bleu should be given ready access to a garden where they can expend some energy. Any fencing should be extremely secure, as they will exploit any weakness to escape and roam. A large scenthound on the loose is capable of causing plenty of trouble and their stamina might carry them for miles before you realise they’re gone!

Grand Bleu are a slow maturing breed. They will not reach their full size until 2 years old. Owners should be careful not to exercise them too much as puppies. Care should be taken not to let them jump down from furniture or go up and down stairs too much to avoid exerting pressure on the growth plates.

Grooming

A Grand Bleu’s short coat is low maintenance so what you save in grooming time you can spend exercising them. Weekly brushing should suffice to keep their coat spruced up. They might require more regular brushing during seasonal shedding in the Spring and Autumn. Their ears should be checked regularly for a build up of wax and any early signs of infection.

Famous Grand Bleus de Gascogne

Since Grand Bleu de Gascogne are pack dogs, no individuals have shone through. Their fame is limited to the list of historical figures who have owned Grand Bleu packs, such as George Washington and King Henry IV of France.

Cross-Breeds

Although the Grand Bleu de Gascogne has contributed to the development of many other breeds, no modern cross-breeds have been created.

User comments

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Sours: https://www.dogzone.com/breeds/grand-bleu-de-gascogne/
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Griffon Bleu de Gascogne

Dog breed

The Griffon Bleu de Gascogne is a breed of dog of the scenthoundtype, originating in France, and is a versatile hunting dog, used on small and large game, in packs or individually. The Griffon Bleu de Gascogne has a speckled, rough coat.

Appearance[edit]

The Griffon Bleu de Gascogne is a medium-large dog, 50 to 57 cm (10.5-22.4 ins) at the withers, with a distinctive rough (shaggy) blue speckled coat, drop ears that are not as long as those on other hounds, and a tail carried up and in a slight curve.

The colour of the Griffon Bleu de Gascogne's coat is the same as the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, white mottled with black, giving a slate blue overall appearance. There are black patches on either side of the head, with a white area on top of the head which has in it a small black oval. Tan "eyebrow" marks are over each eye give a 'quatreoeuillé' (four-eyed) effect, and tan is found on the cheeks, inside the ears, on the legs, and under the tail. Texture of the coat should be hard and rough, a little shorter on the head than on the body. Faults are deviations in appearance or temperament that have an effect on the health and working ability of the dog, as well as an absence of expected features of colour, structure, and size, indicating that a dog with such faults should not be bred. Faults include timidity, soft topline, snipey muzzle, cowhocked, splayed feet, and a wooly coat.[1]

History[edit]

The Griffon Bleu de Gascogne is descended from crosses between the Bleu de Gascogne and the Griffon Nivernais, and possibly the Grand Griffon Vendéen as well.[2] The breed declined for many years, but is now experiencing a revival.[1]

The breed has a good nose and a good voice. It is a good and very alert hunting dog for various kinds of hunting, not just as a pack hound for large game.[2] Examples of the Griffon Bleu de Gascogne have been exported to other countries, where they are promoted as a rare breed for those seeking a unique pet.

Health and temperament[edit]

No unusual health problems or claims of extraordinary health have been documented for this breed. The breed's temperament is described in the breed standard as being highly excitable, but affectionate. Temperament of individual dogs may vary.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griffon_Bleu_de_Gascogne

Dog gascogne

Petit Bleu de Gascogne

Front side view - A black and white with tan ticked Petit Bleu de Gascogne dog is standing in grass in front of a small rock, tall grass and a body of water. It is looking to the left with its mouth open and tongue out.

J WW2003, EST&BALT JW2003, EST JCH Tacoma Du Grand Veilly, wned by Hedvig Tahlfeldt, Kennel Hanging Around

Front side view upper body shot - A black and white with tan ticked Petit Bleu de Gascogne dog is standing in grass looking to the left. There are rocks and a body of water behind it. It has very long hanging drop ears.

J WW2003, EST&BALT JW2003, EST JCH Tacoma Du Grand Veilly, owned by Hedvig Tahlfeldt, Kennel Hanging Around

Front side view - A black and white with tan ticked Petit Bleu de Gascogne dog is standing in grass looking forward. It is panting and there is a large body of water behind it.

J WW2003, EST&BALT JW2003, EST JCH Tacoma Du Grand Veilly, owned by Hedvig Tahlfeldt, Kennel Hanging Around

Sours: https://www.dogbreedinfo.com/petitbleusdegascogne.htm
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Grand Bleu De Gascogne

Origin

Descended from the St Hubert Hound, a now-extinct Bloodhound-type of breed, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne dog breed dates back to Medieval times, when it hunted boars, wolves and bears in its native France. Today it is still used for hunting large game (deer and boar), and is very much a hunting dog for the specialist, rather than a pet.

Personality

This breed is known for his 'deep bay', one of the reasons why he is a specialist dog rather than your average pet – neighbours will not appreciate his vocal tendencies! He is something of a gentle giant – with the typically kind hound temperament and pack mentality.

Health

The Grand Bleu de Gascogne is generally a healthy, robust breed with no widely recognised breed specific health problems.

Exercise

The Grand Bleu needs at least two hours or more of daily exercise. This dog was bred to hunt and is not happy if he's unable to follow his nose for miles and hours at a time.

Nutrition

Large breed dogs, as well as having large appetites, benefit from a different balance of nutrients including minerals and vitamins compared to smaller-breed dogs.

Grooming

The Grand Bleu dog has a no-nonsense short coat that requires very little attention – just a brush over once a week. His long, pendulous ears should be checked regularly, to ensure they are clean and healthy.

Sours: https://www.purina.eu/dogs/dog-breeds/library/grand-bleu-de-gascogne

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Petit Bleu de Gascogne

Photo of adult Petit Bleu de Gascogne

Katarzyna Bujko / Wikipedia.org

The dark brown eyes, slate blue coat and pendulous ears of the Petit Bleu de Gascogne will be very familiar to any fans of the original Grand Bleu de Gascogne dog. Indeed, the two share many physical and character traits, differing only by their size and the prey that they are best suited to hunt. The Petit Bleu de Gascogne breed was deliberately bred by those French hunters who wanted to hunt rabbits and hares rather than boar and deer.

Though commonly kept as a pet nowadays, the Petit Bleu de Gascogne retains its hunting instincts and still has superb scenting abilities and the endurance to track for miles. Despite this, they can make wonderful and affectionate family members, as long as their owner dedicates plenty of time to keeping them entertained and are strict with their training.

About & History

While the Petit Bleu de Gascogne dogs are indeed smaller versions of the Bleu de Gascogne dogs, they were not actually named "petit" (the French word for small) because of their size. They are a medium to large sized hound, and in fact, the "petit" refers to the size of the game hunted by the breed.

Its closest ancestor, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, is a French hound typically used to hunt large game, such as wild boar and deer. When the need arose for a similar dog that specialised in smaller game, such as rabbits, the Petit Bleu de Gascogne took on that role. They were never meant to be a substitute for the Bleu de Gascogne, and instead, were used alongside them. Both breed variants hunt successfully in packs.

While it is generally assumed that smaller variants of the Bleu de Gascogne were used in the creation of the breed, it has been theorised that smaller French hounds were also used. Developed in around the 16th century, the population size of the Petit Bleu de Gascogne took a hit during both the French Revolution and both of the World Wars. While they remain quite well known in France, they are not popular in the rest of the world. In fact, they are not largely recognised internationally, though are official members of the UKC, having joined their scent hound group in 1991.

Appearance

The only physical feature that separates the Petit Bleu de Gascogne from the original Bleu de Gascogne is its size. Males will measure between 56cm and 61cm, while the shorter females measure from 51 to 56cm. Typical breed members weigh from 18 to 22kg. They are often described as being 'well-proportioned', so have not suffered from being 'shrunk down' through the years.

A hunting dog through and through, the Petit Bleu de Gascogne must have a muscular and powerful body. Their head is long and slim, carrying low-set, slim ears that reach the tip of their large, black nose. They have the much-loved eyes of the hound dog: dark brown and deep-set, with a pitiful expression. The droopy skin around their mouth adds to this ‘sad’ look on their face. Their sturdy limbs carry a long torso and prominent chest. Their endearing tail is carried in a saber like fashion.

Their dense coat is one of their trademark features, and while described as 'blue' is actually a particular mix of black and white that gives off a blue hue. Several specific markings are described in their breed standard, including tan markings above their eyelids and a white blaze on their face.

Character & Temperament

A tenacious hunter, the Petit Bleu de Gascogne will stalk their prey with quiet determination. Their stamina is impressive, and they tend to hunt at their own pace, not taking off at a great speed, but rather conserving their energy, determined to catch up to their prey eventually. Within France, their melodic bark when on the trail, as well as their superb scenting ability, have set them apart from other hunting breeds throughout the years.

The well-balanced nature of the Petit Bleu de Gascogne has meant that they can potentially adapt nicely to family life. While individual personalities will vary to some degree, it would be unusual for a breed member to be overly shy or aggressive, and most are downright friendly. Indeed, they have worked closely with humans and animals over the centuries and tend to tolerate others well. It is widely accepted that they should not be homed with smaller pets, such as rabbits and guinea pigs, as they are never likely to accept them as family members – instead, seeing them as prey.

Many breed members are just too laid-back and accepting to make good watchdogs; that is providing they get enough exercise. When bored, it is not unheard of for the Petit Bleu de Gascogne to wreak havoc in a home and howl non-stop. While some may describe their vocal abilities as 'musical', others may not be so kind.

Trainability

Often described as difficult to train, the Petit Bleu de Gascogne is an independent soul that doesn’t always appreciate being told what to do. Undeniably smart, they can pick up on training tasks quickly; provided they are in the mood to do so. Positive reinforcement and firm techniques will be your ally and should help keep these crafty canines on your side. While they are known for their determination, this characteristic tends to be reserved for tasks that they enjoy, such as hunting. When it comes to their training, short and interesting sessions are key to reduce any lack of focus.

As with many dog breeds, exposing the Petit Bleu de Gascogne to a variety of animals and people from an early age will ensure they develop into well-socialised and confident adult dogs.

Health

Generally living to around 11 years of age, the Petit Bleu de Gascogne enjoys good health, and does not have many genetic predispositions. This is a fact that is widely publicised by proud breed fanciers. This good health is likely due to a combination of their genetic diversity and the fact that they have been used as working dogs for so long. Nevertheless, a prudent owner will be on the watch for the following conditions, which may be seen during the dog’s lifetime, including:

Bloat

The deep chest of the Petit Bleu de Gascogne means it is more likely than most to develop this condition whereby the stomach expands and may twist over on itself. Signs will be obvious immediately, and can include non-productive retching, panting and a visibly large belly. This is not a condition that can be treated at home, and the dog must be brought to an emergency vet clinic for treatment straight away.

Ear Infections

When you combine the large, droopy hound dog ears of the Petit Bleu de Gascogne, with their love of nature and the outdoors, it is only a matter of time before they develop an ear infection. Getting ears wet when swimming and the collection of debris within the ears, can both lead to otitis externa.

Exercise and Activity Levels

The Petit Bleu de Gascogne was built to work and has medium to high exercise requirements. They absolutely need access to land to wander on and are not suited to life in small dwellings.

Great care must be taken when outside, as the Petit Bleu de Gascogne will always obey his nose. A secure and high fence is needed to prevent any escape attempts from the garden. Walking off lead is always a risk, as even the most highly trained Petit Bleu de Gascogne is likely to give chase to a tempting rabbit or squirrel they scent. However, this dog loves the opportunity to have the freedom to amble and sniff and should be allowed to do so if the environment allows.

Grooming

The Petit Bleu de Gascogne does not require much intervention in the line of grooming. Their short coat should be brushed down once or twice a week. Their ears, paws and coat should be checked for any stickers or brambles after a foray outside.

The biggest grooming commitment when it comes to the Petit Bleu de Gascogne involves their ears. Once or twice monthly cleaning is necessary to remove waxy debris and keep their ear canals clear. Ear canals should also be thoroughly dried after any excursion involving water.

Famous Petit Bleus

There are no Petit Bleu de Gascogne dogs in the limelight just yet but we are particularly fond of the gorgeous Baron from Instagram who lives in Poland with his humans.

Cross-Breeds

There are no well-known Petit Bleu de Gascogne crosses.

User comments

There are no user comments for this listing.

Sours: https://www.dogzone.com/breeds/petit-bleu-de-gascogne/


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